Press

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

LETTER: NY Health Act would cure high premiums, State Senate candidate Rachel May, Syracuse

By Rachel May, of Syracuse, an administrator at Syracuse University, who is challenging state Sen. David Valesky, D-Oneida, in a Democratic primary — Posted Jul 31, 2018

It's no surprise that health insurance rates in New York are going up again, even for employers ("NY's soaring employer-sponsored health insurance costs among nation's highest," by James Mulder, July 24, 2018.) We can thank Republican efforts to destroy the Affordable Care Act for the rise in premiums, but why are they so high in the first place? A typical New York family insurance benefit (over $21,000) adds more than 40 percent on top of the average Syracuse salary of $49,000. Let's think for a moment about what that means.

It means if you have a business and you want to hire an entry-level worker at, say, $35,000, you have to figure in a whopping 60 percent in overhead in order to offer health benefits. It means you have a huge incentive to hire temporary or part-time workers and avoid paying benefits at all.

Continue reading ...

1 reaction Share

LETTER: Molinaro wrong on NY Health Act, Dr. Sunny Aslam, Auburn Citizen

"Molinaro pledges to veto universal health care bill if elected NY governor" (The Citizen, 7/26/2018) shows we need a candidate for governor who has a plan to provide health for all who live in New York state. The article does not mention that traditional Medicare's model of extremely low admin costs would save taxpayers an estimated $45 billion in the first year alone. The threat of tax increases for business and the addition of $90 billion (!) to the state budget are hung over the reader. The final boogeyman is when Molinaro mentions a state takeover of health care.

Sadly, Molinaro offers no solutions of his own for the crippling and increasing costs of health care in New York.

If the New York Health Act were to pass, we would find few of the above scare tactics are true. Instead we would find free choice of physicians (free market choice not government takeover) in New York state; tremendous administrative cost savings; businesses no longer spending $2 billion per year finding health plans and overall health care payroll costs lowered. Life saving pharmaceutical prices would be negotiated in similar fashion as done by the Veterans Affairs (VA) who pays 40 percent less than the general public. You can read the study yourself at www.infoshare.org/main/Economic_Analysis_New_York_Health_Act_-_GFriedman_-_April_2015.pdf.

Most New Yorkers (estimated 98 percent) and businesses would pay less and often far less than the $25,000 average costs of a family health insurance plan.

I work as an addiction psychiatrist. When my patients don't come to treatment or get medications because of loss of coverage, burdensome paperwork requirements by insurance companies or outrageous drug costs, they can stop breathing. It makes you furious when politicians like Molinaro refuse humane approaches like the New York Health Act. I've found the governor's lack of support of universal healthcare upsetting; maybe he'll stand up now and champion the New York Health Act.

I'm thrilled to be supporting a slate of candidates who actually support this improved, expanded Medicare for all approach: Cynthia Nixon for governor, Dana Balter for congress, Rachel May and John Mannion for state Senate.

I hope this fall you will support candidates who are serious about universal healthcare and lowering health costs for consumers and businesses.

Read the original letter here.

1 reaction Share

LETTER: Elect St. George for state Senate, Earl Callahan

Just got my invitation to state Sen. Jim Seward's retirement party and I can't wait to go! It's scheduled for Election Day, Nov. 6, as Joyce St. George of Delaware County becomes our voice in Albany: standing up to institutional corruption in New York state government and standing up for single-payer health instance.

Single-payer health insurance — model for the world — is a centerpiece of this small business owner's campaign. Not only would it sharply cut costs by eliminating the insurance-company paper shuffle, it would eliminate the onerous county share of Medicaid, reducing county taxes in Cayuga, Otsego, Chenango, Delaware, Cortland, Ulster, Herkimer and Schoharie counties by more than 20 percent.

Affordable health care and a sharp cut in property taxes if we elect St. George, a corruption investigator. Imagine how much we'd save if we got rid of corruption?

Read the full letter at the Auburn Citizen here!

1 reaction Share

Cuomo, foes debate NY health bill, Oneonta Daily Star

Nixon, a longtime activist and actress, came out strongly in favor of single-payer health care legislation.

“Health care should be a human right, not a privilege for those who can afford it,” Nixon said in a campaign video. She added that the New York Health Act that has been approved in the Assembly would cover all New Yorkers.

With lawmakers set to be on recess through the rest of the year, it is unlikely that Cuomo will have to deal with the single payer legislation in 2018. In comments last September that gave himself wiggle room on the issue, Cuomo said it would be preferable to have the health care debate settled at the national level.

“If they were to pass it and it was not incongruous with what the federal government would do to us, I think it's a very exciting possibility," he said in a radio interview then.

Read the full article at the Daily Star here.

1 reaction Share

LETTER: Big push for NY Health Act, Helen Krim, Riverdale Press

Plans are afoot in Washington to further weaken the Affordable Care Act or eliminate it entirely. The recent appointment of a new Supreme Court justice and recent moves by the Department of Justice could bring these plans to fruition, thus throwing millions of Americans off their health insurance plans.

In New York, passing the New York Health Act is the obvious and proactive response to this potential crisis. Years of rigorous review and solid econometric studies have shows that New York State’s 23 million people would save an estimated $70 billion in the first year of operation with the simple elimination of private insurance. Even after the deduction of transition expenses, such as training displaced workers and providing them extended unemployment benefits, the New York Health Act would save $45 million for patient care.

With its huge base, the state can negotiate volume discounts for pharmaceutical products and medical devices. Fraud detection, simplified with the elimination of multiple payers, would result in further savings. Administrative costs would be similar to those of Medicare at 2 percent of premiums collected, as opposed to up to 17 percent for commercial health insurers.

The argument that providing health care to all residents of New York State is too expensive is absurd. It would cost less than we pay now, and provide insurance for the 2 million New Yorkers who currently have no health insurance, or who still can’t see a doctor due to costs.

Read the full letter here.

1 reaction Share

ARTICLE: Local businesses support NY Health Act, New Franklin Register

Many people worry about the cost of their own healthcare, but local business owners also worry about their employees.

“I can’t afford to offer healthcare to my coworkers,” said Faiga Brussel, owner of Good Cheap Food in Delhi. “Years ago, I tried, and quickly ran into a brick wall of financial disaster and had to backtrack. Now it is so much worse.”

Health coverage is particularly important for local farmers, well aware of their work’s physical dangers (https://goo.gl/hGXYKT).

“The occupation itself is an injury to your body,” said Eleanor Blakeslee-Drain, who owns Berry Brook Farm in Delancey. “So health insurance is a must for us.” Blakeslee-Drain, her husband, and two sons will lose Medicaid this year, because their vegetable farm now makes enough money that they no longer qualify.

“We used to joke that since giant agribusiness gets massive government subsidies to not grow corn, Medicaid was our small farm's subsidy. But without Medicaid, I'm worried that our options will either be expensive or not very good coverage."

Read the full article at the New Franklin Register here.

Add your reaction Share

LETTER: Murphy Should Hold TownHall on Healthcare, Mary Jane Kilian, Northern Westchester Examiner

About three weeks ago I took a day to visit my state senator, Terrence Murphy, in Albany to express my growing concern with rising health insurance costs. He was not available. . . . which was disappointing because, as he is someone in the medical profession, a chiropractor, I expect him to share some of my concerns. Despite expressing great interest in mitigating the opioid epidemic, he is mute about this pressing issue of rising insurance costs for all of his constituents

Our group of l7 did meet with a member of his staff. She listened attentively, assuring us she would communicate our concerns to Senator Murphy. Included in our group were health care professionals, local legislators, and constituents with stories of struggles to pay for health care and prescription drugs. Outspoken were clergy and church members who spoke of the moral and ethical right to affordable health care as a human right.

We were disheartened that Senator Murphy’s representative was unable to tell us the Senator’s positions on issues we raised, refusing to respond to our basic question ...

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

SERIES: Healthcare in America, Helen Krim, This Is the Bronx

This is part of an ongoing series that gives Bronx writers a chance to share their personal stories on the state of healthcare in America.

by Helen Krim

My cousin’s son, Sammy, would have been nineteen years old in July if he had lived. He was adopted at birth by my cousin and his wife who loved him very much. They were unable to have their own biological child, but never felt the lack once they adopted Sammy. My cousin’s wife had a highly skilled technical job, and my cousin also was working.

When Sammy was six, tragedy struck. My cousin’s wife became ill, lost her hearing and her short-term memory. She became disabled and could never be left alone. She couldn’t be relied on to turn off the burner on the stove or remember that she had started to run a bath. My cousin needed to take care of her and Sammy, an overwhelming task at first.

Fortunately, they did not lose their house because of disability payments ...

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

LETTER: The time’s right in New York for single-payer health care, Richard Clements, Buffalo News

For over 30 years in business as an employer, I often complained about our dysfunctional health care “system,” but with a company to run, that was all I did. Since my retirement, though, I’ve been able to devote time to working with the Campaign for NY Health, promoting rational single-payer health care for all New Yorkers.

We’re getting very close to succeeding. On June 5, the Assembly easily passed the NY Health Act for a fourth consecutive time, but the GOP-controlled Senate would not even debate it. Despite overwhelming agreement that health care should be a right, their excuse is that “it would require a massive tax increase.” Several rigorous detailed studies disagree....

 

Continue reading.

1 reaction Share

LETTER: Passing NY Health will benefit all, Julie Woodward & Celeste Theis, Poughkeepsie Journal

Imagine not being able to afford the insulin that keeps you alive, or a high deductible keeps you from using your insurance at all, or you’re staying in an abusive relationship or miserable job just to keep your coverage, or nursing home costs wipe out your family’s savings.

These are some of the stories we heard in Albany on June 5 from a diverse group of citizens visiting state senators Terrence Murphy and Sue Serino to urge them to support the NY Health Act (S4840/A4738). This legislation proposes a single-payer system funded by broad-based revenue and ability to pay. Neither senator seems to be in favor of it, or even talk about it openly with constituents.

Virtually everyone has a healthcare insurance “story.” ...

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

SERIES: Healthcare in America, Sean Engelking, This is the Bronx

I agree with Warren Buffet who said, “medical costs are the tapeworm of American economic competitiveness.”

I face this daily: First, as the owner of a small business in New York City, and, second, as one of the thousands who deferred healthcare treatment for fear of bankruptcy.

Allow me to explain. In my small business, I see the high costs of insurance stall the mobility of first-class candidates. Those with the best qualifications are often stuck in dead-end jobs because they cannot afford to lose their expensive benefits package by jumping ship to me.

And I am always juggling the costs of growing my business with the costs of providing competitive insurance. Recently, I found a superb candidate from Austria who does not require insurance — so I am relieved of high-cost deductibles and other administrative payroll expenses.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

LETTER: Passing the NYHA will benefit all citizens, Julie Woodward & Celeste Theis, Poughkeepsie

Imagine not being able to afford the insulin that keeps you alive, or a high deductible keeps you from using your insurance at all, or you’re staying in an abusive relationship or miserable job just to keep your coverage, or nursing home costs wipe out your family’s savings.

These are some of the stories we heard in Albany on June 5 from a diverse group of citizens visiting state senators Terrence Murphy and Sue Serino to urge them to support the NY Health Act (S4840/A4738). This legislation proposes a single-payer system funded by broad-based revenue and ability to pay. Neither senator seems to be in favor of it, or even talk about it openly with constituents.

Read the rest of the letter at the Poughkeepsie Journal here.

1 reaction Share

LETTER: Bill would provide health care for everyone, Melanie O'Brien, Watertown Daily Times

One of the most persistent misconceptions about single-payer health care is that it will cost too much. When my husband was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 30 in 2013, we had no health insurance, a young son and made about $35,000 a year. It was only through the extraordinary generosity of family, friends and even strangers were we able to pay the tens of thousands of dollars that it cost to treat him, not including the lost wages from months of being unable to work or the regular CAT scans, blood work and doctors visits he has needed for the last several years to make sure he stays cancer-free. Even after we were finally able to get insurance under the Affordable Care Act, his tests and visits have not always been covered.

How many GoFundMe pages for medical treatment have you shared on Facebook or seen pop up in your feed? Each month, I see a new flier posted around town advertising a fundraising dinner for someone’s medical expenses ...

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

LETTER: Let's fight for NY Health Act, Naomi Marcus, Riverdale Press

On June 5, I joined hundreds of people from all over New York State to lobby in Albany in support of the New York Health Act. 

The New York Health Act passed the Assembly for the fourth year in a row on June 14, and would provide a comprehensive system of access to health insurance for all New York state residents....

Continue reading.

1 reaction Share

SERIES: Healthcare in America, Walter Carpenter, This Is the Bronx

This is part of an ongoing series in which Bronx writers share their personal stories on the state of healthcare in America.

by Walter Carpenter

I almost died eleven years ago. Initially, I had a job with insurance, but illness cost me my job. Losing my job cost me my insurance. Not being able to afford healthcare almost killed me. My story is that of a vicious, like-threatening, cycle. I’ve learned that hundreds of thousands of Americans have a similar story.

A few years earlier, I had my first episode of biliary duct obstruction and didn’t get so sick. My insurance company paid $1,500 for a cholecystectomy and, after weeks of recovery, I was almost back to normal, living my life and doing my job, but now my job didn’t include health insurance. Not all jobs do, even some that recruit you with promises of health insurance....

Continue reading.

1 reaction Share

Healthcare in America (#6 in series), This Is the Bronx, Alice Love

This is part of an ongoing series that gives Bronx writers a chance to share their personal stories on the state of healthcare in America.

by Alice Love

I am a registered nurse working in a doctor’s office at a major NYC medical center. Here is an example of how much time “prior-authorization” costs in a busy office. I am trained to treat patients and certified to do procedures on patients. But, if the best course of treatment is not on the “formulary” of an insurance company (which works with still another company to manage its medication approvals), I spend hours dealing with a convoluted system.

Here is what I recently needed to do to get a patient the best care possible ....

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

Denying care to those with preexisting conditions, Sunny Asalam, Finger Lakes Times

The Trump administration will no longer oppose discrimination by health insurance companies against those with preexisting medical conditions, which is particularly cruel and deadly. This places 133 million Americans' ability to buy health insurance at risk.

The President seems intent on harming the population because he abhors his predecessor or is intent on increasing health insurance company profits that are soaring anyway. What makes even less sense is that this hands his political opponents a potentially thunderous win before important fall elections.

Imagine a relative of yours comes to my clinic for addiction or pain treatment. The insurance company realizes they had a previous diagnosis like pregnancy when they applied for the insurance and cancels the policy. They're found dead from injecting heroin after they can't afford to pay for treatment.

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

Americans could learn from Canadian health care, Richard Clements (letter), Buffalo News

Published June 13, 2018

Sunday’s front page story, “New tariffs spark fears among local business owners,” included thoughtful, rational comments for and against Trumps’s stiff tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum, but one quote from Craig Speers of the AFL-CIO stands out as candidate for bone-headed comment of the year! He called out “predatory trade practices” by Canada and European Union that supposedly “destroyed large parts of the American steel and aluminum manufacturing industries.”

As an example he points to Canada’s national health care system as unfair since “… the Canadian government frees its metals industries from a heavy cost burden that their American competitors have to bear.”

What?

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

Letter: Health insurance needs an overhaul, Dr. Sunny Aslam, Auburn Citizen

The Trump administration will no longer oppose discrimination by health insurance companies against those with pre-existing medical conditions, which is particularly cruel and deadly. Your online article points out 133 million Americans ability to buy or afford health insurance will be at risk if they are successful (6/8/18, "Trump's DOJ labels the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional, placing healthcare for 133 million at risk"). The president seems intent on harming the population and moving us backward, because he abhors his predecessor, or is intent on increasing health insurance company profits that are soaring anyway. What makes even less sense, is this hands his political opponents a potentially thunderous win before important fall elections.

 

Health insurance premiums could increase by an average of 24 percent next year if approved by state regulators. Insurance companies rightfully blame President Trump’s repeal of the individual mandate in his recent tax cut resulting in millions less covered by insurance, most of whom are younger and healthier. It’s more expensive to take care of an older, sicker population for insurance companies. In order to accommodate their profits, large bureaucracy and huge executive salaries, insurance companies raise premiums.

1 reaction Share

ARTICLE: Town of Saugerties urges state lawmakers to pass New York Health Act, Daily Freeman

Several town residents speaking at a recent board meeting said the state action would reduce costs for Medicare patients.

“If you’re on traditional Medicare, you spend hundreds of dollars a month on Part B Medigap insurance and Part D pharmaceutical,” Janet Asiain said. “If you’re on the Advantage plan, you have co-pays, deductibles and all kinds of out-of-pocket expenses, which really mount up.”

Tamara Schuppin said traditional health insurance plans have deductibles that can drain bank accounts before benefits kick in.

“It would affect me in a big way if I had health care that actually covered my needs,” she said. “I currently have a plan with a $10,500 deductible, and I pay several hundred dollars for that every month. It’s not health care. It’s in case I have a catastrophe to keep ... from having our savings wiped out.”

David Minch said the state action would help improve New York’s business climate.

“It would be a magnet for New York state to have people coming back in, as businesses could be freed up of the health care [insurance] that they have to supply,” he said.

Read the full article here.

1 reaction Share

Support New York Health Act, Barbara Estrin, Riverdale Press

On Tuesday, June 5, several Riverdale residents joined more than 500 supporters of the New York Health Act to demonstrate in Albany for its passage.

From every corner of the state, they traveled by bus, car, and even bicycle all the way from Brooklyn, in support of the bill.

They were among doctors, nurses, health care professionals, business owners, representatives of organized labor, and ordinary citizens who are convinced that this plan would benefit all New Yorkers regardless of wealth, income, age, immigration or health status.

Supported by Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz, the bill is likely to clear the Assembly overwhelmingly, perhaps by the time The Riverdale Presshits your mailbox.

The push for the New York Health Act comes when it seems most necessary, Republicans in the U.S. Congress are threatening cuts to Medicare, Medicaid and the Complete Health Improvement Program — or CHIP — to fund the deficits caused by their tax bill.

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

Do or Die: A Day in Albany Advocating for Statewide Healthcare, Donathan Salkaln, Now Chelsea

UPDATE:On Thurs., June 14th, in Albany, NY, Assembly Health Committee Chair Richard Gottfried and Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie announced the passageofa universal single-payer health plan that would provide comprehensive health coverage for all New Yorkers.

BY DONATHAN SALKALN | How bad has our health care system become? A 25-year-old man is sideswiped by a truck on a busy Downtown street. The ambulance brings him to an East Side emergency room. “Broken leg, shattered bone sticking out of skin,” recalled Dr. Danny Lugassy. “He’s pulling out IVs, and pushing away nurses. I ask him, ‘What are you doing?’ He begs me, ‘Please do the bare minimum possible. I just started a job, but my health care won’t start until next month!’ ”

On June 5, two buses loaded with advocates of single-payer healthcare, mostly from Chelsea, Hells Kitchen, and Greenwich Village, left W. 33rd St. near Penn Station and headed to the state capitol to rally and lobby with others for single-payer healthcare. The event was organized by the Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP) in tandem with the New York State Nurses Association (NYSNA), 1199 SEIU, and over 100 labor and community organizations in the Campaign for New York Health. The day included pre-arranged individual office meetings with state senators, to voice healthcare concerns.

Continue Reading

 

1 reaction Share

Insurance wastes time and lives, letter by Steven Rabinowitz, Riverdale Press

As part of the ongoing discussion on health care policy, it has been noted that health insurance today wastes time, resources — and lives. It costs us far more than simply dollars for premiums and deductibles, and creates harm.

Here is how that applies to an issue much in the news today — the opioid crisis.

I recently retired after 30 years of service with the state Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services, the last 12 of those serving as director of downstate field operations, overseeing funding, program deliverables, regulatory compliance, and service development for New York City and Long Island.

In that role, I oversaw the work of more than 200 provider agencies, large and small, and was responsible for more than $200 million in state aid funding.

Continue reading

1 reaction Share

LETTER: Americans could learn from Canadian health care, Richard Clements, The Buffalo News

"Sunday’s front page story, “New tariffs spark fears among local business owners,” included thoughtful, rational comments for and against Trumps’s stiff tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum, but one quote from Craig Speers of the AFL-CIO stands out as candidate for bone-headed comment of the year! He called out “predatory trade practices” by Canada and European Union that supposedly “destroyed large parts of the American steel and aluminum manufacturing industries.”

As an example he points to Canada’s national health care system as unfair since “… the Canadian government frees its metals industries from a heavy cost burden that their American competitors have to bear.”

What?

Canada is unfair because it provides universal healthcare to a healthier population, without potential personal bankruptcy due to medical expenses, at a fraction of our costs?

Would you propose that Canadians repeal a domestic program that has functioned with overwhelming public support for 50 years?

ADVERTISEMENT

Do you really believe they should accept the dysfunctional mess of our health care “system”?

Read the full letter at the Buffalo News here.

1 reaction Share

New Yorkers tired of healthcare issues converge on Albany — Tom Bulger, Finger Lakes Times

New Yorkers who are tired of healthcare issues converge on Albany

By Tom Bulgar

To the Editor:

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in healthcare is the most shocking and inhumane.” (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr)

Yesterday (June 5), buses from all over the state headed to Albany, carrying New Yorkers tired of being the only industrialized nation without universal healthcare, tired of paying twice as much as any other nation for its healthcare, tired of being ranked 37th by the World Health Organization for quality of care.

NYhcampaign.org is determined to end the nightmare. If you were unable to go to Albany, please phone Sen. Helming.

The state’s House has passed the New York Health Act, which now has 31 senators cosponsoring it. I don’t know if Sen. Helming is one of the cosponsors. A powerful line from New York’s own Paul Simon is, “‘Save the life of my child,’ cried the desperate mother.” As a mother herself I hope our Senator empathizes with mothers whose children are endangered by unaffordable healthcare.

Continue reading …

 

1 reaction Share

SERIES: Healthcare in America, Sonya Haifa, This Is the Bronx

This is part of an ongoing series for our writers to share their personal stories on the state of healthcare in America.

by Sonya Haifa

I am living proof that even the hardest-working, most educated people can lose it all in a matter of months — I went from earning $225K a year to less than $21,000 now. After losing my 60-hour-a-week, high-pressure corporate communications job in New York and then having COBRA expire, I signed up on the Affordable Care Exchange, paying for my disabled husband’s and my coverage with savings.

Sadly, neither the psychiatrist nor the psychologist I saw regularly for chronic depression was covered under any of the Exchange plans, so we paid out of pocket. In my early 50s, I was having little success in finding another job, which exacerbated my depression. Then my husband was diagnosed with PTSD after being violently assaulted, so he too was seeing a psychologist on a weekly basis.

In 2016, our healthcare bills exceeded $40,000. It so quickly drained our savings that we had to sell our NYC home and relocate to a cheaper location in the Hudson Valley. It is terrifying to know that losing your job and needing critical health services can rapidly drain all the financial resources you’ve worked years to accrue. Having health insurance tied to employment makes losing a job not only scary, but potentially life-threatening.

 

Continue Reading 

1 reaction Share

New York needs health act for comprehensive care, Poughkeepsie Journal letter, Peter Van Aken

Letter by Peter Van Aken

May 22, 2018

In spite of recent presidential and secretary of health and human services speeches about plans to bring about a lowering of prescription drug costs, the stranglehold of unreasonable medical fees, by the insurance companies, still continues — and makes essential medical care a problem for the vast majority of New Yorkers.

We need the New York Health Act, a bill in the New York State Legislature Senate, (S4840A) to be passed and enacted.

Right now, the Insurance companies are in charge of our personal health care- giving us high premiums, high deductibles, and co-pays. The New York Health Act promises universal comprehensive health care for all, and covers treatment by primary doctors, specialists, hospitalization, mental health, dental, vision, prescription drugs, lab tests and medical supplies — this legislation would create coverage that would be even more comprehensive than commercial insurance health plans- and it is calculated that it would save 45 billion dollars a year — $2,200 for each New Yorker.

Continue reading ...

1 reaction Share

OP-ED: Universal health care in NYS would save money and lives, Madeline Zevon, Journal News

How would it be possible to have more comprehensive health care coverage, including every New Yorker, and save $45 billion a year? It might sound impossible, but that is just what the New York Health Act, currently before the state Legislature, would do. Ninety-eight percent of New Yorkers would save an average of $2,200 a year. In the last legislative session, the bill passed 94-46 in the Assembly and had 31 co-sponsors in the state Senate, just one senator away from a majority.  

With the passage of the New York Health Act, all residents of New York would have comprehensive coverage including primary, preventive, specialists, hospital, mental health, substance abuse treatment, reproductive health care, dental, vision, prescription drugs, and medical supplies. The coverage would be more comprehensive than commercial health plans. There would be no co-pays, deductibles or premiums.

Read the full op-ed at the Journal News here.

1 reaction Share

The Chronogram: Can New York Pull Off Single-Payer Healthcare?

The US Healthcare System is Broken. New York Could Lead the Way to Fixing It.

click to enlarge

The New York Health Act proposes single-payer healthcare which would do away with the private insurance companies.

About 10 years ago, when she was 44, Eve Magdalengoitia had a hunch that something was wrong. She was experiencing concerning symptoms of the lady sort, and her doctor said it's probably nothing, but let's get you an MRI to be sure. At the time, she was working as a consultant from her home base in Poughkeepsie, writing grants and fundraising for nonprofits; her husband was a self-employed artist. They didn't have health insurance. The expense of an MRI (ballpark $2,600) was so daunting that Magdalengoitia convinced herself that her symptoms were nothing to worry about. She was young and healthy, wasn't she?

Read the full article here.

Add your reaction Share

LETTER: Myths, misinformation and facts: NY Health, Jack Carney, Adirondack Daily Enterprise

1 reaction Share